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    • Crysyn

      Only help if you can be helpful

      Hey All, A topic has come up of late in the IRC channel in regards to the general feel of the forums and the community that supports them. Things have progressed further than I would have liked with out this being addressed more publicly because I would much rather have snubbed this out sooner rather than later.. but I have been busy. Here is the general rule I would like people to follow: Wheaton's Law "Don't be a dick." Those of you from the IRC channel know that this is the only rule I ask people in there to follow and we generally have a good and lively time chatting about all manner of things. This is basic rule that just about everyone understands and I am going to expand it to the forums from here moving forward. If you can not help people in a helpful and polite manner then I simply ask you to stop. Now I generally take a back seat to moderating the forums as I like to participate in the suggestions forum fairly heavily at times and would rather do so as a forums user than a moderator. But I am also fairly well known for being the person who constantly puts their foot down and so I am stepping up and doing so on here. If you find yourself unable to respond to a message politely then I ask that you do not respond. This mostly focuses on the increasing level of hostility found within the Suggestion forum as well as the Server forum. I do not care if this is the 30th some odd time you have seen someone make the same suggestion. Or even if the new post on an older topic is one entry above the old one. I expect the members of this forum to respond politely to the user, new or old, and point to the older topic if it applies and even go the extra step to suggest they either add in new information or to summarize the outcome of the previous discussion based upon the new post's entry into it. That is what we are here for, that is why I close most topics instead of deleting them, so that they can be found and referenced down the road. The next topic is the slew of derailment attempts I have seen as of late. If you want to have fun and joke around that is what the off topic forum is for and pretty much anything goes there. I do not expect to read a suggestion thread and have to go through 3 pages of image memes people have shot back and forth. Quite simply this is a waste of my time to read and then have to clean up. Now for the summary. I am going to start taking a more active role, especially in policing the suggestion forum, and handing out warn levels to people whom I see doing this. These will be indiscriminate and applied not to just the first person who derails or is impolite on a topic or response, but to everyone whom follows the lead of that person. As I do not like doing things with out giving you all warning this post shall serve as that warning. If you have a desire to bring this topic up with me then I invite you to do so on the IRC channel. Lets raise the level of quality and grow the community. Let us not descend into the quality often found on the minecraft or league of legend forums. There is simply no need for that here. Be passionate about things, just do not be abusive.
    • Kittychanley

      Offline Servers

      Recently I've seen a few server listings showing up on the first page of the Servers forum that have been closed for an extended period of time, but have recently gotten a reply from a new member who didn't realize the server is offline. To help prevent this from happening in the future, it would be greatly appreciated if you could use the report function on the original post of any servers that have been confirmed as offline, so that the topic may be locked. If you are the admin of a server and plan on taking the server offline, please use the report function on the original post of your topic to let the TFC Staff know that the topic should be locked. If you are the admin of a server that has a locked topic, and would wish to bring the server back online, please use the report function on the original post of the topic to let the TFC Staff know that the topic should be unlocked. As always, please remember to follow rule #3 of the servers forum and update your topic title to contain the version of TFC that the server is currently running. You can do so by editing the OP, and then clicking on "Use Full Editor."
Shiphty

Shiphty's Shiftless Slog (A photo journal)

42 posts in this topic

I made up my mind, this time around, that I would find an area that met a specific set of criteria before deciding to make it my home.  I did list those criteria in another post but I'll reiterate them here:

-Rainfall of at least 1000

-EVT of 2

-Average Temperature between 18 and 20

-Plenty of trees

-An upper layer of igneous rock

-Close proximity to both fresh water and salt water

 

I wandered for months until I stumbled upon the perfect location; a small clearing in a hickory forest, west of a lake, just north of a saltwater gulf.  (I can't quite figure out how to find what the seed is or I'd link it and give the coords.)

 

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Here is the little survival dugout which I called my home for the first year and a half.  I didn't come up with the idea, someone posted it on the forums (can't remember where I saw it) but I did improve on it by adding a spider-safe cross trench in the middle.

 

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Standing atop a douglas fir in the rain over my camp.  You can see the land still needs to be cleared.  Please notice the lone potato plant.  I call him Luther.  He's still there.

 

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Time to slay trees!

 

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The land to the east of the lake, which I have not yet named, consists of rolling hills as far as the eye can see.  These hills are rich in minerals, I stumbled upon exposed tetrahedrite often and also ran across visible veins of other sorts including kaolinite and graphite.

 

In my first mining attempt I tapped a lode of tetrahedrite near to the surface and partially exposed in a rocky column.  Unfortunately I was so preoccupied with staying alive that I did not take any pictures.  I neglected to bring a hammer and chisel when I set out to make the mine and so it was quite a dangerous endeavor in which I nearly cut myself off from the surface entirely.  Don't forget to bring a chisel when mining kids!

 

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My second delve into the earth was much safer and comfortable, you can see I brought a chisel this time.

 

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I unearthed a great deal of cassiterite.

 

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Mining is work.  Here is a level of the mine.  Each level consists of a floor, a three cubit high space, and a ceiling, five cubits total.  I know that some folks like to leave more stone to save time and tools but this sort of mining is easier on my psyche.  I'm pretty good with a pro-pick though so I think it balances out.  You will also note that I've made my supports over smooth stone, this is in case there is a chamber below.  If the floor gives way at least the ceiling won't follow it.

 

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I found a fresh water spring very close to the mine entrance.  It seemed to go down for hundreds of cubits.

 

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I plotted where the spring would be and carefully poked a hole to create a water supply within the mine.  This made trips to the surface unnecessary.

 

I wanted to build my home on a hill which I could shore up for safety.  There were two hills close to my camp.

 

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The hill to the southeast was shorter but wider.

 

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The hill to the southwest was taller but skinnier, it was mostly more of a ridge.

 

You will also notice my imported flock of sheep.  I made rope and dragged them from the western hills.  The trip was around two thousand cubits.  Dragging livestock is harrowing.

 

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I ended up choosing the southeastern hill.  Oh, and did I mention that this place has ridiculous amounts of clay?  I've got nearly two double chests full just from excavating this one spot here.

 

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It took some doing but I acclimated the sheep to my presence by feeding them grain regularly.  At first I thought I had to keep them from eating grass so that they'd want the grain but it turns out that they'll always choose grain over grass.  Now I can sleep through the night in a comfy bed!

 

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It was a long job but I cleared around the hill and terraformed it quite a bit.  I also added a plank to protect my fire pit in the dugout from rain.

 

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Here's where I decided to build my house.  That patch of gravel is the location I sunk my mine shaft.

 

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It's one thing to dig a slip-shod mine to quickly gather resources when you're far from home.  But given the luxury of time and resources I like to do things the right way.  And the right way is, of course, the dwarven way.

 

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I needed (and still need) a huge amount of smooth stone, stone, and cobble stone for my building project.  I found what I thought was a boulder in the eastern lee of the hill opposite my own.  The boulder turned out to be a ledge where the stone layer poked out of the soil.  This became my quarry.  I employ a three dimensional grid to gather as much raw stone as possible.

 

Full disclosure: Those supports are standing on smoothed stone which is floating.  I'm not even sorry :D  I generally would've made my quarry more believable but it appears chisels have been nerfed a bit.  I'm not complaining, just stating the fact of the matter.  I think I'd also be a bit more concerned with believability in my quarry if I was playing with other folks.  As it stands, I was in a hurry for a great deal of stone and I got lazy.

 

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The quarry needed to be expanded twice more so far.

 

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I mined out a small bit of basement and after nearly three years of wilderness living, I slept in doors.

 

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Excavating the full basement took a great deal of time but cutting all that raw stone was the real time-eater.  The walls look like they're cut from the living rock but they were mostly dirt and gravel before.  I know, I know... it's a square basement... very cube-y.  I never claimed to be some master artist/architect.  But perhaps as I build it'll take a shape that is more pleasing to the eye.  It's deep enough for a level of cat walks to reach any supplies that are stacked up high.

 

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The floor is cobble for a flag stone look but because I don't trust cobble I had to lay smooth stone beneath it.  I did that under the bottom of the raw stone walls as well.  I'm kind of a perfectionist.  I may switch out the diorite cobblestone for rhyolite from the layer beneath at some point, just for a bit of variety.

 

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I'm using oak for the wood floors above, I'm not sure that I'm happy with it but all the other trees in the area are either too pale or too dark.  I had to import the oak.  Two thousand or more cubits east, on the other side of the hills, there is an oak forest.  I don't think I like that stair case, I am almost certainly going to move it.

 

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Here's a look at the floor from ground level.  You may notice that malnutrition has set in, I've been mostly scavenging.  After this I did plant a little garden on the edge of the pond just north of my first camp.  And yes, I'm still using some stone tools in an effort to make my bronze last, I don't want to have to go mining again until I finish building my home.

 

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A skeleton outline of the first floor.

 

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Speaking of skeletons... I found some strange crypt while I was excavating a side chamber to the basement.

Edited by Shiphty
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Just kidding, this will be my food storage.  The floor is cut a half a cubit lower so that I don't have to worry about mobs spawning since I intend to keep this room dark.

 

And that's all the work I've got done so far.  I plan to keep adding pictures as I make progress.  I welcome anyone's input but go easy on me, I'm not a hardcore builder.

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Nice

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Hell yeah, super neat! I especially like the trick with smoothing the stone underneath supports; I'll have to do that next time I go mining, it's a really good idea.

 

You can get the seed by typing "/seed" into the game, or by highlighting the save in the world select menu, choosing to recreate it, and then going to "more world options".

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Thank you for this amazing story, it made my day. It is like an great article in a good magazine. I was totally absorbed by reading.

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That's a giant house coming! I never had the patience for big builds, even in vanilla.

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Hell yeah, super neat! I especially like the trick with smoothing the stone underneath supports; I'll have to do that next time I go mining, it's a really good idea.

 

You can get the seed by typing "/seed" into the game, or by highlighting the save in the world select menu, choosing to recreate it, and then going to "more world options".

 

Thanks for the tip!

 

The seed is:  -5254707721613871140

Version: 0.79.20.710

And I'm building around X: 2816 Z: -8659

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More Progress!

 

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I like having everything I can accessible inside my base so I need to go out as little as possible.  To that end I decided to mine out a chamber off of the main basement in which to generate charcoal.  Here is a great example of what I call 3D grid-mining.  Mine out a three dimensional checker-board pattern in order to harvest as much raw stone as possible.  You'll also end up with a great deal of rock.  If you smooth the boarder as well you get tons of smoothed stone thrown in.

 

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It takes a bit of practice to figure out which stones to break if you want to maximize your raw stone intake.

 

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Now just break the one under each of these!

 

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Finished upper chamber with a hole to climb out of when the chamber is full of logs ready for burning.

 

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Finished lower chamber where the logs will be stacked.  Don't worry, I've got a lower entrance behind me, I'm not stuck down here.  I understand that doors have been made flammable and cannot be used for charcoal chambers any longer so I'll plug the holes with sand when I want them closed up.

 

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I didn't realize it when I first began building but there's a natural spring on the little ridge just east of my home.  Of course my experience in the cassiterite mine taught me that springs make for great indoor plumbing!  I'm using the JourneyMap mod so I put down a marker where the spring was in order to more easily mine a tunnel straight to it below.  However, if you don't have a map mod you can just hit F3 while standing over the spring to discover its coordinates.

 

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Thar she blows.

 

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Indoor fountain!  Now I don't need to risk my life when I need a drink at night (I hate using jugs when I don't need to.)  And this water source will not freeze.

 

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Chests stacked three high in the food storage.  It's even darker than in this pic since I roofed the stairwell.

 

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I tore out the old staircase, began the cat walk and built the stairs where they should be.  The upper door on the right exits onto a landing connected to the food storage.  The landing is connected to stairs going up and down.  Yes, that lower door meets those stairs, I'm a fan of redundant passages... just in case.  Those stairs continue down to the base of the charcoal pit.  You can also take them up past the landing to the house above.  The mineshaft on the left is also a way to get there.  The shaft will eventually sink down to bedrock with a passage every five cubits.  It's my version of a minecraftian elevator, you can get off at any level between here and bedrock.

 

I still need to build a pottery room off of the main basement.  I also want to prepare the workshop above for metal work but that might have to wait.

 

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I've been building the walls with hickory but I'm not quite satisfied with the dark red color.  I may have to go wandering to find another type of wood.  Any suggestions (the floor is oak)?  Am I being too picky?

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I'm a bit embarrassed.  I thought I settled on an igneous layer but this whole time I've been building with dolomite.  And that's fine, it doesn't look bad.  As an added bonus I don't have to look for flux.

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Full disclosure:  I started my game with cheat options.  I hadn't played TFCraft in a long time and wasn't looking forward to re-gathering all the fruit trees.  However, by the time I found a place to settle I'd found all of the fruit trees and all but one of the berry bushes on my own.  So... I've yet to actually go "OP."  I guess it's a good thing anyway, just in case something glitches out I can pretend I'm a mod and fix it.

 

Also, I have torches at 0.  I know when the burning out of torches was first discussed there were a lot of people with strong opinions on the matter either way but I'm really super glad that Bioxx and Dunk kept it an option to not have them burn out.  Everybody has their own style of play and different things are fun to different people.  I like having to work for success but at the same time I am very much fond of the idea of taking territory and holding it.  I tame a land and it is completely tame.

 

Additionally, I kinda miss the old mechanic for cave-ins.  It was possible to tunnel without braces if you were very careful.  I've turned down the possibility of cave-ins in an attempt to recreate the old mechanic.It's a game.  I'm having fun.  I suppose some folks might see these things as wussy or whatever and I'm okay with that.

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I think the hickory and oak woods look good together; good balance of dark and light. But if you can find some birch trees, you may like that.

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I think the hickory and oak woods look good together; good balance of dark and light. But if you can find some birch trees, you may like that.

 

 

Thanks.  The hickory is actually growing on me.  I did go and find aspen for shingles.  I've been meaning to post more pictures but I've been so caught up in actually playing.

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Well, after much ado I've managed to pull myself away from playing to post some more screenshots.

 

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First floor walls finished, sans windows and doors.

 

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I needed a great deal more oak wood so I used the rest of the mot-mound as a nursery.

 

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However, it takes oak a while to grow so I went back for lumber in the meantime.  Don't you love it when those tribal drums begin to beat time while you're running home?

 

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Oh you deceptively beautiful sunset, how you endanger me.

 

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I shored up a walkway leading from my back door to the spring.  I will eventually construct an archway beneath it.

 

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How not to die whilst traveling: hide at night.  I try to find a fresh water source.  It helps if the water is bordered by a hill or cliff.  I dig down one cubit and cover myself in lumber.  Once the frogs stop croaking it's about time to emerge and begin traveling once more.

 

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That little garden started to produce more food than I could eat.  Of course this meant it was time to try my hand at brewing alcohol.

 

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Two barrels of whiskey, three barrels of beer (my favorite) and the rest is vodka.  Seriously, if you want a huge amount of alcohol, grow potatoes.  I think the two on the far right may be vodka vinegar.

 

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Okay, here's what happened:  I was constructing what I thought would be a standard piqued roof but once it was up it looked awful.  Since the house is so wide and long a 45 degree slope made for a roof that was at least as tall as the main body of the house.  Ew.  So I cut it down and sloped the ends but left a flat platform.  The roof goes up exactly one more story (five cubits) and then becomes a deck of sorts.  And what was I to do with such a flat surface?  Erect a tall watch tower of course!

 

I really thought I was going to fall to my death the whole time I was building this.

 

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If you don't have a tower you really should build one.  Setting aside utility, it's really a lovely view, particularly in the morning.

 

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A view of the house from the spring out back.  That upper deck still needs a thatch roof but the frame for it is up.

 

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The thatch makes it feel nice and cozy.  I swear, I'm really starting to love this house.

 

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Of course the top of the tower needs a railing.  I'm starting to agree with DanDerth about the combination of oak and hickory.

 

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The guard rail for the ladder isn't as safe as it looks.  There's a space between the ladder and the railing, just enough for someone to slip.  But it looks pretty anyway.

 

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Attic storage area.  The front room takes up the ground floor, second floor, and attic above it so each level acts like a balcony.  I'm particularly fond of the timber rafters.

 

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And here we see the front room, which will become quite useful later.  Still no doors or windows.

 

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Stairway to the attic from the second floor.  I'm standing in what will eventually become my bedroom.  To the right is the upper level of the smithy, to the left is a balcony over the front room.

 

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Here's the second floor balcony over the front room.  Man, I really love those timber rafters.

 

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Again, second floor balcony over the front room.  And yes, hunger just caught up with me.

 

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The bedroom exits onto an outdoor balcony which provides a roof for the basement stairway as this set of stairs is not actually a part of the house proper but an annex was made for it.  Eventually these oak trees will be replaced by an orchard, berry bushes, and a flower garden.

 

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And here we are in the front room.  I do plan to eventually light the place up in a more presentable fashion.  For now the torches keep the creatures away.

 

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Here we have the first floor of the smithy.  The mineshaft goes down to connect to both levels of the main basement chamber and continues on down to the mine.

 

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And now a view from the kitchen out the back door to the spring.  The kitchen became and remains a catchall workshop while the building is underway.

 

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The basement stairway annex connects to the kitchen.  The door off to the right leads to the front room and farther right is the stairway to the second floor which spills out into the upper smithy area.

 

On the first landing of the basement stairway are doors to either side with the dark room food storage on the left and the basement main chamber scaffolding on the right.  Further down is a door which leads to the basement's main chamber proper and at the bottom is the charcoal chamber.

 

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And here is the front of the house.  The roof shingles are made of aspen.  That was quite a journey as well.  Sorry, no screen shots though.

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Here is a better view from the rear of the house.  You can see the spring on the left and my original shelter and the garden pond on the right.

 

What do you guys think?  Does the tower look silly on top of the roof?  If I was going to do it over I'd build it along side the house.  I still might.

 

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The kitchen and smithy needed forges and forges need chimneys.  Yeah, it's a little blocky, I plan to eventually work it with a chisel.  I'm doing all the major building first and once everything's where it should be I can take my time and pretty it all up.  I suppose I'm also putting off the fine details because I'm better at function than appearance.

 

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There will eventually be a grate over the kitchen forge.  And again, I plan to pretty it up a bit.  But here is the basic structure.  I've yet to put trapdoors in the chimney.  I hate seeing the rain come down my chimney.  And yes, the forges are both set forward so the rain cannot affect them.  The forge in the smithy is a siamese twin to this one.

 

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The chimney also serves the standard fire places in the upper smithy and my bedroom.   These are also both identical and attached.

 

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I wasn't sure whether the chimney needed to be higher.  What do you guys think?  After I took this shot I chiseled one layer off the top bricks so that mobs couldn't spawn up there.  Santa is welcome down my chimney, creepers... not so much.

 

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This may just look like another screenshot of my house but if you scroll up you can find a shot where I'm standing in this exact spot, on my original shelter, and there's only a wooded hill there.  I included this for contrast.  Look how far I've come!

 

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Lovely sunset view from my tower.  There below are my sheep pens.  The terrain all around is hilly and dense with trees.  That would end up being my next project.

 

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But first I lit the forge and waited to see if my house would catch fire.  It didn't. (Yaaay!)

 

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Then I brought all of my supplies indoors.  It's unspeakably nice to be in a house after years of rough living.  I will never go camping again!  (Excepting every single time I have to journey out into the world in search of some supplies.)

 

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Most of my supplies were kept in the kitchen, the food was kept in the food cellar, but all the bulk items such as dirt, gravel, sand, and uncut timbers were put in the front room temporarily.

 

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I got tired of running up stairs in order to run down stairs so I constructed an entryway directly into the main basement chamber.  This door spills out onto the upper scaffolding of that chamber.

 

I suppose if I was concerned about attacking armies I might have abstained but as it stands the forces of darkness don't seem to be very organized and only attack me when they happen to see me.

 

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I cut down the trees all around my house, at least one hundred cubits in every direction.

 

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Then I set to terraforming the land.  I wanted a flat property.  There were quite a few lucky finds.  I found bituminous coal and bismuth in abundance without even looking for it.  There were also abundant traces of limonite and magnetite.  I certainly picked a good spot to settle.

 

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Here is my quarry after the hills and trees around it have been removed.  I made sure the hills outside of my land were sloping away.  This was an immense endeavor.  I only employed bronze to make saws, picks, and chisels.  All the digging and chopping was done with stone tools.

 

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Among some clay I found a few strange bits of soil.  I cannot account for this at all.

 

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And then it happened!  I was ambushed in broad daylight by a skeleton.  Before I could get away he had skewered me three times with javelins.  The fourth one whistled past my head.  If his aim had been true at the last I'd have been finished.  I decided to pay more attention to my diet, craft some leather armor, and string a bow.  I had not yet died and did not intend to.

 

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You can see here that my health was much improved after that.  Additionally, the coal seemed to simply be laying on the ground for the taking.

 

I have yet more screenshots but I haven't uploaded them to photobucket yet.  More updates will be forthcoming.

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Some folks must think I'm insane for doing all that work with stone tools rather than racing to get steel first.  But ya know, I'm really having a blast.  There were a couple of times where I felt like I was getting a little burnt out while leveling all that earth but every time I make a little breakthrough or finish a project I'm keen and excited about this build all over again.  I've never made it to blue or red steel, not even black steel, but I think I might actually do it this time.

 

In addition to the fact that I'm enjoying myself, I figure I'd go through so much steel doing what I'm doing that I'd spend more time looking for the steel in order to use it up so that it's actually faster to just finish the terraforming with stone.  Twice zombies dropped bronze shovels and man, I went through those things in minutes.  Most of the terraforming is done now at any rate.

I've also discovered that I was wrong about the body of salt water, it isn't a gulf but an inland sea.

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I think it looks really cool, is THE tower for the mineshaft?

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The tower and the mineshaft are separate.  The mineshaft only comes up to the ground floor and the tower begins at the roof deck.  I use the tower to survey the surrounding area.  It's also nice to just climb up there once in a while and enjoy the view.

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Well, this morning I have time to upload some more screenshots and bring the journal current.

 

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Clearing and leveling the land was quite a long haul.

 

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Very nearly done...

 

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Annnnnd done.  The spring is shored up with its own stairway and the entire thing is fenced and gated.  Brewing will no longer be a rushed job.

 

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The trees grew in so fast and make it difficult to tell but this land is completely flat.

 

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Yup, definitely flat.

 

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Torchin' up the place.  I don't intend to just leave the torches out in the open but they'll keep the baddies away for now.

 

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I'm always trying to come up with creative ways to keep the dark forces from spawning.  I realized that these timber tips would present spawning opportunities.  Rather than put up a torch or jack'o lantern I just wedged a little board into the intersecting crack on each one.  You can hardly see it from the ground.  And yes, I use pumpkins for scaffolding.

 

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I call these things warding stones.  I dig a pit down two cubits, put a smoothed stone in the bottom, top it with a torch, then cap it with another smoothed stone.  Then I shave the top stone down to one eighth of a cubit.  It's a lot of work but it looks better than a torch forest.

 

I feel that there ought to be a mechanic in the game which lets you permanently take territory and make it safe.

 

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Alright, so, I found every resource I needed except for chickens.  I went on a long journey and covered thousands upon thousands of cubits... no dice.  I got so frustrated I actually considered cheating.  But the idea of cheating made me lose the will to play.  I finally gave up and went to bed.  The next day I read that you could pluck feathers from friendly pheasants.  And so, with renewed vigor, I made up my mind to capture and tame pheasants.  However, while I was exploring the nearby sea for the best route by which to bring home some cattle and horses I'd discovered, I stumbled upon an entire continent populated with chickens.  So.  Many.  Chickens.

 

I brought the chickens home.

 

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I also brought back the cattle, horses, and a mated pair of donkeys.  I am only lacking swine, which may be found in the nearby woods.

 

You might've noticed that my health seems to have regressed.  Yes, I died.  After over seven years of harrowing adventures and striving for survival, I stumbled down a crevice in a field.  I was pretty upset over the ordeal, I was beginning to hope that I wouldn't die at all.  I don't like dying.

 

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I plowed up the rest of the soil around the pond.  I can now perform crop rotation by circling the pond.  I also hedged the farmland in with gravel.  I'd discovered that saplings like to grow too close to my garden and the plants will become uprooted.

 

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The front room is jam-packed with chests full of soil, gravel, sand, and tons of uncut wood.

 

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Pine on the left, ash on the right.  And yes, you can attach ladders to stacked wood.

 

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Hickory for days.

 

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White cedar stacked in the smithy.

 

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Douglas Fir in the charcoal chamber.  I don't really care for douglas fir.

 

There are also stacks of aspen, maple, oak, spruce, and white elm.

 

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After acquiring a tremendous amount of livestock I decided it'd be prudent to trek up north and bring home as much salt as I could.  I ought to have brought more than one pick and I didn't learn from my first mining expedition as I also left my saw at home.

 

I arrived at the site with little time before dark.  You can see that my shelter was quite sloppy but it sufficed to keep me and my new salt mine safe.

 

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The smoothed rock salt floor serves as a roof to the salt mine below.

 

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Upon returning home I cleaned up the top of the mot yard and planted my orchard.  I still need to decide where to plant the berry bushes but I think I'll wait till the trees are full grown.

 

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Though it served me well, it was clear that I needed to disassemble my old shelter.

 

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Sheep, cattle, horses, and chickens were all gathered together and given their own pens.  These pens were then fenced in as well in case any of the animals escape the first barrier.  There is a space reserved for pigs.  This whole livestock area is at the front foot of the mot.

 

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I decided it was time to work on acquiring steel.  The first thing I needed was a kiln room.  I excavated a little space next to the main basement chamber near the mineshaft.

 

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Seven pit kilns is more than enough for my purposes.  The entire room is made of stone, no fire danger.  And I don't have to go outdoors.

 

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I remembered that anvils used to keep metals from cooling so I laid out two stone cut ones.  Unfortunately, things have changed.  I had to use the forge to reheat about half of the copper ingots in order to craft the seven double ingots for my first metal anvil.

 

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A bronze anvil was the next immediate project.  It was easier the second time around but I did reheat four of the ingots.

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My land is starting to look more settled but is still under construction and not entirely pretty.  Here is the view from the tower toward the west.

 

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And the north.

 

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And the east.

 

I did begin excavating the land over a magnetite vein on my western border but I may put that project on hold until I've acquired more copper.  I need enough bronze to make a bloomery.

I don't think I'll have to go far to find copper, this land is dripping with minerals of all kinds.

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holy terraforming batman...this reminds me of when a friend had me flatten an entire mountain to reveal our hidden obsidian tower on a vanilla pvp server. thing took like half a week. my mcmmo scores were off the charts though for mining and digging XD.  i dont know how you can stand doing it on single player.....

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holy terraforming batman...this reminds me of when a friend had me flatten an entire mountain to reveal our hidden obsidian tower on a vanilla pvp server. thing took like half a week. my mcmmo scores were off the charts though for mining and digging XD.  i dont know how you can stand doing it on single player.....

 

I generally listen to something that I can think about while I'm working; social commentary, philosophy, theology, or a let's play.

 

Having rough and bumpy ground drives me nuts.  I want my land to be easily traversable.  Nothing worse than trying to gather sticks and saplings and accidentally falling into a chasm.

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(Pardon any errors for this entry, I'm typing with a munchkin climbing on me.)

 

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I'd picked up a great deal of magnetite nuggets on the south western edge of my land and craving steel I scraped all the topsoil off the area to make sure I didn't miss any ore and began a strip mine beneath the flattened land.  Of course I was more established and so I took my time with this mine.

 

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If you're trying to make a strong ceiling you cannot rely on the default height of the support beams but must add one additional section to each support before you place your crossbeam.  The crossbeam should be the height of your ceiling, not under it.

 

You should already know the size and shape of the chamber you are constructing, this method doesn't allow for removing any supports until you have excavated the entire area, then you work backward taking down the last supports first and the first ones last.

 

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After all the supports are in place you can shore the ceiling up with whatever strong material you have available.  Smoothed stone is my favorite.

 

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In this case the vein was very close to the surface, it was almost a breach mine.

 

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Unfortunately magnetite is difficult to distinguish from dolomite.

 

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During one of my food runs I discovered that my roosters had been up to no good.  Chic-splosion.

 

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This branch being finished, needed its supports removed.

 

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Since the previous support covered the area over these supports I could take them out without any trouble.

 

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Then close up the hole and you've got a finished and safe ceiling.

 

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Rinse and repeat until you work your way back to the beginning.

 

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No muss, no fuss, just a completely finished ceiling over my brand new magnetite mine and quarry.  Yes, quarry, I intend to build a wall to make my land safer.

 

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Speaking of quarries... Since my old quarry is on my land I couldn't leave it in such a messy state.

 

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I had to give it a somewhat finished ceiling and cover it over for safety's sake and because the open pit prevented me from building a wall around the perimeter.

 

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No more belief and gravity suspending supports.

 

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I really should do something with all that vinegar.

 

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It may not look big but this vein produced around one hundred and sixty iron bars worth of magnetite ore.  No, I haven't smelted it, I still need more copper for enough bronze necessary to construct a bloomery.  No fear though, Ol' Shiphty has a plan.

 

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While I was clearing the land above I found two native copper nuggets almost directly in the center of my quarry.  I figured if I simply tunnel straight down I'd hit copper in no time.

 

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I was right.  The copper was at the very top of the rhyolite layer below.  There was a little cavern in the way but the drop was only bruise-worthy.

 

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For exploratory tunnels you needn't excavate much of the stone in order to remain safe.  Keep your tunnels one cubit wide and two cubits tall except where you put up braces.  I like to put them every five cubits for measurement's sake.

 

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This tunnel is safe, easy, and fairly quick to mine out.  I do not know of a better method for exploratory mining.

 

If I wasn't munchkin-sitting I'm sure I'd have steel by now.

 

Yes, I sit on munchkins, it's much easier to watch them if they are trapped under you and cannot move.

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It just keeps getting better and better! What date is it in-game for you? Must have taken a lot of time to make this awesome house and so much terraforming.

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I'm currently up to the 7th of December in the year 1007.  Thanks for the reminder, I've got to harvest before the frost sets in!

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Ha-ha, I'm also harvesting my crops ! Though it's October here. The veggies probably could probably survive another month in this climate, but the fruit trees must be harvested in their harvest period or you lose the fruit. 

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